Why the ACA’s Adriana Grimes Insurance Problem is Worse Than You Thought

  • October 10, 2021

A recent article on Breitbart News entitled “Why the ACA is Worse than You Thought” paints a picture of the insurance market as a “black hole” where millions of Americans lose their health coverage and have their coverage cancelled or postponed. 

The article is based on a recent survey of insurance brokers by the Institute for Healthcare Security and Policy, which found that only 12% of insurers were able to accurately report on the state of the health insurance market and the number of enrollees. 

Of the remaining insurers, only 21% were able accurately to estimate the number and types of people in their networks and the percentage of people enrolled in their plans. 

“Adriana” Grimes, an Alabama woman who lost her coverage under the ACA, is one of the people who suffers this loss. 

According to the study, the average premium for a silver plan purchased through the Affordable Care Act (ACA) was $4,000, and the average cost of coverage for a bronze plan was $3,000. 

But, according to the insurers, Grimes was able to buy coverage on the ACA marketplace because she met a “risk-based” requirement: “If you had a pre-existing condition or were under age 65, you could be offered an ACA-compliant plan for $2,500 or less.” 

That means that, if you are not able to meet the ACA risk-based requirement, you are essentially being turned down for coverage. 

In other words, you have to have a preexisting condition to be eligible for an ACA plan. 

Adriane Grimes, however, was not eligible for a pre -existing condition, nor was she on a pre enrolment form. 

Grimes is now one of more than a million people who have lost their health insurance coverage under Obamacare and the ACA has been called “one of the worst health care failures in US history” by the Washington Post. 

Obamacare was supposed to cover millions of people “by providing coverage for the uninsured,” according to a recent Washington Post report. 

As of December 30, more than 9.8 million people were covered through the ACA and it had more than $7 trillion in coverage available to Americans. 

With millions of their fellow Americans unable to purchase coverage on their own, the insurance industry and the White House have attempted to blame the ACA for causing these problems. 

One of the big arguments for Obamacare, according in the Washington Examiner, is that it is “better for the American people” to have more people in the insurance pool, which is a claim that is frequently used to justify cuts to social programs such as Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid. 

When confronted with the fact that the Affordable Healthcare Act does not actually provide healthcare to everyone, the media is quick to point to a number of studies that say that the law has actually reduced the number of uninsured people, especially women. 

For example, a report from the Urban Institute concluded that the expansion of the ACA expanded coverage for women, with a significant reduction in the number in the “underinsured” category and an increase in the rate of insured adults over 65. 

Furthermore, the report found that in 2013, “women were the most likely to have insurance coverage, with more than half of women aged 20-44 having coverage.” 

The report also found that women are more likely to be uninsured than men. 

And, the study found that while the number for women increased in the year after the ACA was enacted, the number did not decline. 

A separate study by the Commonwealth Fund found that the number increased from 1.7 million to 3.2 million. 

Even though women are the majority of the uninsured, the data indicates that the ACA expansion has had the opposite effect for women.

 According the Commonwealth Report, “Women’s participation in the ACA-mandated Medicaid expansion has fallen from 17.7% in 2013 to 14.9% in 2019, while the share of women with private insurance fell from 28.5% to 24.9%.

Women were not the only group to see decreases in their share of coverage: the share of white women who were uninsured in 2014 was 7.9%, down from 10.5%. 

Similarly, white women under the age of 65 were less likely to own coverage than were women in their 40s. 

However, the most dramatic change was for people aged 55-64, with the share in the underinsured category dropping from 27.9 to 25.4% in the same period. 

More than a third of the drop in underinsured coverage can be attributed to the ACA. 

While the Affordable Health Care Act has increased access to health care coverage, the problem is that the coverage is not necessarily affordable. 

Many people who are not insured do not qualify for Medicaid, a government program that provides health insurance for low-income